Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Three Goblins

In Dwimmermount, goblins are a playable race, taking the place of halflings/hobbits, with whom I've always been uncomfortable in D&D, particularly nowadays. Consequently, I had to purchase Otherworlds Miniatures' line of goblins for use in the campaign. Here are photos of a few of them, courtesy of the player of Dordagdonar.



19 comments:

  1. Goblins taking the place of hobbits. Now those truly are three "funny little birds," they have no wings!

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  2. PC goblins huh? It is interesting how were are 'old-school' in spirit, but not fan-boys who follow the old books like bibles. Just an observation, I too do my own thing as it fits my vision of the campaign, with player input and its own sort of play-evolution.

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  3. Gee goblins as a playable race. Why does that sound familiar? ;-)

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  4. makes sense to me. If I were running a game at this point, there would be no halflings or gnomes, and probably very few elves(yet dwarves, for some reason, get a pass in my mind).

    Is Goblin society integrated into the civilized world in your game? Or do players have to live as outlaws if they choose that race?

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  5. Interesting...In my unnamed campaign I have a guy playing a hobgoblin...should be fun to see what he does with it.

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  6. The third Goblin looks familiar, is that the pose from the original MM?

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  7. I've always liked goblins and kobolds more than halflings and gnomes. It is hard to see the latter as more than just little people, but the physical differences make it easier to see the former as members distinct cultures that are quite different from our own.

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  8. I've always liked goblins and kobolds more than halflings and gnomes. It is hard to see the latter as more than just little people, but the physical differences make it easier to see the former as members distinct cultures that are quite different from our own.

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  9. Hmmm... I like the idea of Goblins taking the place of halflings. I'll have to keep that in mind.

    Also, very nice job on the minis. I am really impressed with the quality of Otherworld minis.

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  10. I am curious why the issues with halflings?

    I know that They do not feature heavily in my games, but then again, gnomes feature even less.

    I do like the idea of goblins as a PC race. I am assuming you are giving them typical goblin culture and not civilizing them as was done in the Iron Kingdoms setting.

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  11. One of my "Aha!" moments reading through the S&W Whitebox was in the class description of Halflings. To paraphrase: Halflings are the small people of your campaign.

    In other words: here's a template for a small character race. Call them what you like and treat them like this (mechanically).

    Search and replace halfling with goblin and you're done.

    Love it. Oh, and good looking minis too btw.

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  12. Back in the day goblins were a little bit different. Tom Meier of the original Ral Partha made a set of goblins with large shields, spears, and hauberks that stopped at the waist. A friend of mine at the time described them as "anatomically correct." Looks like goblins are dressing themselves a little more modestly these days.

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  13. The minis have that great "chunkiness" of the old Grenadier and Dungeon Dwellers lines, but with nice, clean casting. I was wondering if they are true 25mm or the more modern "heroic" scale.

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  14. I remember the older Citadel and Ral Partha trolls, goblins, orcs, etc all having that "under the skirt" detailing. For us young boys it was always a bit of a chuckle and an "ewwww" factor to have to paint those parts.

    I loved the personality in the old RP orc and goblin lines. Definitely old school and before every goblin and orc turned into a bat-eared, pointy nosed or lantern-jawed greenskin.

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  15. Halflings *are* goblins. They're short, they live in the ground, they eat a lot, and they steal things!

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  16. Is Goblin society integrated into the civilized world in your game? Or do players have to live as outlaws if they choose that race?

    Goblins are considered "civilized" beings by most Men, albeit barely. In some places, they mingle freely with humans, while in others (perhaps the majority) they're treated as second class citizens. Dwarves dislike them, because they compete for living spaces and elves treat them no worse than any other species, which is to say, they look down on them as "ephemerals."

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  17. The third Goblin looks familiar, is that the pose from the original MM?

    More or less, yes.

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  18. I am curious why the issues with halflings?

    Mostly, I consider halflings to be too closely tied to Middle-earth to make much sense in a setting whose inspirations and sensibilities are very different.

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  19. To paraphrase: Halflings are the small people of your campaign.

    Yes -- just as elves are the "magical people" of your campaign, whether they're Atlanteans or Melnibonéans or Faerie-style elves.

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