Sunday, March 28, 2010

Dwimmermount Game Table

I've received several requests for photographs of my group's game table au naturel -- as it is in the heat of actual play rather than "staged" for public consumption. Here are several I took during this evening's session.


This photo was shot from my perspective. You can see my dice, OD&D books, Ready Ref Sheets, minis (yeah, they're plastic prepainteds -- sue me), and a bunch of unused dungeon blocks, among other things. You can also see where a couple of players sit, along with notepads, character sheets, and other accouterments.


This one was from a little bit later in the evening, shot from beyond one of my players. You can see that the amount of the dungeon represented by the blocks has grown somewhat.

This one was an "overhead shot" during a break in play much later in the night. You can see my printouts of the treasure tables from the Monster & Treasure Assortment, along with the Labyrinth Lord books I often use alongside my OD&D books.

I'll do a recount of the events of the session itself later this week. It was a very good session, one in which Brother Candor came within 1 hit point of death and a long-time hireling met his demise. The characters also inadvertently delved deeper into Dwimmermount than they intended and learned more about the activities of the Argent Twilight within the mountain fortress. All in all, a good night's fun.

14 comments:

  1. Looks like a lot of fun. I look forward to the report. :)

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  2. Nice, which company makes those dungeon blocks?

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  3. @Zanazaz:

    Hirst Arts: http://www.hirstarts.com

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  4. This raises another question, James, one that's nagged me since you began your Dwimmermount campaign.

    Who exactly are these player? Longtime friends? Random gamers recruited from your local game shop? Some combination thereof?

    Moreover, are they active in the blogging community, and do they appreciate your participation in RPG blogging?

    Just curious. Dwimmermount is certainly one of the best recorded campaigns I've ever come across. I feel like I know about everything...except the players.

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  5. It looks very nice, I can almost feel the game feeling =), the usage of dungeons blocks is a great move to make the players feel they really are in the dungeon. Thanks for this very interesting post!

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  6. Stunning really stunning, What game rules did you use?

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  7. James uses Original D&D (OD&D) with supplements from other old school sources such as the above-mentioned Labryinth Lord.

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  8. Very fun.

    What hirst arts molds are you using?

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  9. Take away the fancy blocks and add some empty bottles of Fat Tire Ale, and it could be my table!

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  10. Who exactly are these player? Longtime friends? Random gamers recruited from your local game shop? Some combination thereof?

    Moreover, are they active in the blogging community, and do they appreciate your participation in RPG blogging?


    My regular players consist of real life friends and my 10 year-old daughter. I've had new people drop in for a few sessions, as time permitted, but, by and large, my players are all people I've known a long time.

    I don't talk much about them outside of the context of the characters they play because I respect their privacy. Given the absurd amount of vitriol I generate in various quarters by saying the most innocuous things, the last thing I want to do is expose anyone I care about to it unnecessarily.

    That said, they're all fine with my blogging about our sessions and three of my players have at various times posted here in the comments. But none of them are much plugged in to the online gaming scene, which, some days, makes me think they're far wiser than I am.

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  11. James uses Original D&D (OD&D) with supplements from other old school sources such as the above-mentioned Labryinth Lord.

    I've lately been leaning a lot more heavily on Labyrinth Lord than I had been in the past, primarily because the sheer awesomeness of the Advanced Edition Companion, whose rules are creeping more and more into game play.

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  12. What hirst arts molds are you using?

    That I couldn't say, since they're the creations of one of my players. He's the real master of modeling and miniatures painting, so, with luck, he'll show up and be able to answer your question.

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  13. Thanks for the response re: players. Not trying to pry or anything...just genuinely interested at the type of person you had around your table.

    captcha: leperic

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  14. @Kiltedyaksman:

    The walls are made with the #70 Fieldstone wall mold. The floor tiles are the #260 Flagstone floor tile mold. There are a few pieces here and there from The #75 Ruined Fieldstone mould and #71 Fieldstone Accessory mold. Right now I have to say I'm jonesing for the #77 fieldstone octagon mold since I'm trying to do diagonals without it and it's not turning out to be much fun.

    @PatrickWR:
    I play Dordagdonar in the game. James and I met through a common Friend when he came to university here in Toronto, however that's really Jame's story to tell. No I'm not much plugged into the online RPG community or any online community as I prefer my anonymity. I am frequently amused to read James accounts of our gaming sessions to see the events from his point of view. It's been a privilege to participate in this and see it grow over the last year or so. I can't wait to see where it's going to go.

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